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the chief of production goals from unconventional shell plays, i think the environment going forward has never looked brighter for u.s. infrastructure. >> i think et was yesterday someone said nat gas is the new safe haven, suddenly this is start to go look a little more price afforded. any view on that? >> i think that dmodty prices, a broader view, i think that peak energy, we believe in just the opposite at yorkville. we think energy prices will probably be the growth driver of the global economy. it has a lot of implications. it's very good for the u.s. and our consumers. it's very good for china. >> you say peak energy in terms of we're going to see declines -- >> i think we're going to see stability. the new energy supplies coming online are more expensive to extract from the ground, so you're not going to get back to $20 a barrel oil in our lifetime. but this $80 to $11 is 00, peaking at $120 dropping to $60 is probably a new range in the u.s. i see natural gas, it's at 350 right now, roughly, $4 to $6 range, $16 in japan, mid teen prices in germany. that's giving us a competitive
created a tense environment for many american muslims. while authorities have not released any information linking the alleged attack to religion, american muslims fear that the minds of some are already made up. >> it is a unique thing being a minority within the united states. it is not often like a when a white christian blows something up. and it is a fine line, there is a feeling of dread we're hoping they're not muslim. however, in the bay area we have some reports of hate incidents. fortunately, nothing has escalated to violence with people being confronted to that because of their apparent".their apparent religion." >> zarha goes on to say that muslims like herself, who are civil rights lawers, doctors and teachers are representatives of the larger american muslim community and what they want to contribute to the united states. >> the giants are not taking any chances at a-t-and- t park. for last night's ball game, once again they stepped up security precautions. although there were long lines, most fans were in good spirits and went with the flow. >> better safe than sorry. >> thi
police department in the world, something i'm very proud of. but it's a complex environment. 8.4 million people. we wanted to know more about the neighborhoods that we were policing. that's the report that we did. the so-called demographics unit since change theed name, but that's what you're reporting about. it was never put in place to generate leads. it was put in place for us to have contextual information. people will say you have people not generating leads. but we generate leads in other ways, but not from that particular unit. >> how important is it it to have the cooperation of the muslim community? because one thing i'm struck by, it is citizens who report things. so the time square bomber, the police was a block away but it was a local vender who tips you off. in this case, it it appears that this guy who got his legs blown off said i want to tell you something. i saw this guy dropping a bag off. so is it important to have a cooperative relationship between a police department and these communities that you're looking at? >> sure. and we have a strong working relationship with
answer. you can reduce the risk of an incident but you cannot create a fail/safe environment. certainly not along a 26-mile plus path that goes through commercial, residential areas. it is difficult enough at an ampitheater, race track, gymnasium, or stadium. i think we'll see in the future perhaps additional security but there are certain venues that it is very, very difficult to maximize to a point where you're fairly competent that nothing can happen and certainly a marathon is one of those kinds of events. as you and i both know every day in this country there are multiple venues where hundreds if not thousands if not tens of thousands of people for social, political, athletic reasons show up. so there will be lessons learned based on this tragedy. there will be probably a little more inconvenience down the road about -- i read with great interest that the london marathon is going on. pittsburgh is having a marathon next week. they have not canceled that. they're encouraging the runners to go. there was an interesting piece by tom friedman today in the "new york times." he basically
-- scare people, but what you should do in this environment is don't get distracted from there, don't go for fear. >> ross, if what you're saying suggests, perhaps, gold still is a safe haven, why do you think so? >> let me qualify that. it's an imperfect safe haven. it's an imperfect safe haven, particularly in the short run. >> against what? >> against financial meltdown or inflation or politicians not doing what they should do, in that case. so it's an insurance plan, if you like. >> is the reason we have this down move is because people are now -- is the gold pricing in the fact we're not going to get more qe out of -- >> it may be. and it's part of the story dwr the shorts have hit gold is not because of what has happened, but because of what hasn't happened. we haven't had hyper inflation. we didn't have the euro collapse. certain things didn't happen. i think that would have aggravated the gold market. fundamentally, it still remains in the short-term a long haven and imperfect. >> if nvs the kind of move, you know, that indicated that if gold were going to respond to more quantit
back to what is a normalized environment. what does that even mean? i can't value it. i don't know how to value. >> i think it's interesting, the mainstream press. the front page of the washington post is the spring swoon and how we cannot seem to escape this economic decline and we've seen the past couple of springs and the front page of the journal is walmart and kohl's taking more time to pay their supplier, a trend they say is getting worse. those are not marginal positives, jim. i look at bank of america. i look at j.p. morgan and i say i'll pay 83.5 for 50,000 j & j. the trade is i don't want to mess with the stuff. proctor, look, he's making the quarter. he's going to make the quarter. >> raw costs coming down and coca-cola, by the way. raw costs are coming down, but they will come down. another one that is just where people are hiding. david, it's hide and don't seek. >> it is, but to carl's point, we've come out of the last few years and animal spirits start to feel strong. >> right. underlying economic growth is strong and everyone is revising up their gdp numbers up to three
and the potential for further government spending cuts and the regulatory environment. >>> and listen up, everybody.it looks like fed chairman ben bernanke, he's going to to the annual jackson hole symposium this week. it may not sound like a big deal, but this is the first time he's marked that event since 2006. reuters quote the spokes woman who says bernanke is not planning on attending because of a personal scheduling conarthritic. they've used this forum to try ask preview important fed actions. just about every big move they've made along the way he has made public at jackson hole. people have been wondering if he was going to talk about a potential successor this time around. >> can i give you a conspiracy theory? if this is -- this is like your place. if you run the fed, you go to this thing, right? and if this was going to be the last time you could go as the fed chairman, if you thought that he was going to be stepping down next fall or next spring, rather, you probably would find a way to show up. >> actually, i look ate more as him having not made up his mind yet. if you haven't decide
something. about being aware of your environment. if it looks unusual. tell something abit. a -- about it. >> best advice. don't let them affect your life. go back and live your life. >> live your life. when you compromise how you live that gives them a victory. as painful as it is to day. you can't let them succeed by us changing the norm and how we live. can't let them win. no victories. >> i think the last point is so important. you can't let them win. can't say i will not go to the ball game because of what if? that's what they want. >> that's what they want. they want you to stay home and watch this coverage and be too scared to do anything. you have to go out and live your life. important clues, for as chaotic as that look. there are important clues of behind the -- >> the injured. if anybody has hand injuries. some one could be using bomb make mag terl and residue on their hants. >> this shrapnel and things that could have come from the device itself. >> that's right. and pierre thomas is reporting what they want to see is how was it detonated, remotely detona detonated, with a cel
environment and fortunately we had this happen that the first responders were ready and the tents were there and we do have some of the best hospitals in the world and it could have been norse -- worse. neil: but what it does about shaking america is confidence i will say we had been immune but largely save since 9/11. of lot of close calls that we have dodged that while seeing madrid, london, but not here. does this get americans that it cast a pall over this country again? >> is certainly makes us more aware if you have to be diligent to your surroundings that is something is out of place reported you are wrong you are embarrassed but if you are right you save lives. we live in the greatest country of the world we are best when our back is against the wall i am most proud of our country right now. people working together in marathon runners running to the hospitals to give blood. that is the of country we live in so hopefully people will be more aware but hopefully they will get mad with this form of terrorism to get back with the drone strike that we will stand tall and continue on
east have more experience with terrorism. and their security environment reflect that reality. but here in the u.s., there is a delicate balancing act between liberty and security. and it's still a work in progress. bret? >> bret: steve centanni live here in d.c. steve, thank you. some of the most compelling accounts to come out of boston are from the eyewitnesses. and the people who tried to help. correspondent douglas kennedy has that part of the story. [explosion] >> the bomb that where to through boilston street took with it lives and dreams. in fact, many people in boston and the nation. especially those who saw the mayhem firsthand. >> it went off, you know, my ears, you know, just from the compression of the explosive device hit us and shattered the window next to us. and, you know, and i looked back and i see a cloud of smoke. >> it took probably five or ten seconds to realize what had happened because it couldn't happen there. so, it was just too surreal. >> still personal tragedy quickly turned into communal hope as the city almost instantly came together. to comfort the falle
anything else becoming empowered to look into your environment and what we're seeing from boston, heroes is comi
and the rest of the middle east have more experience with terrorism. and their security environment reflect that reality. but here in the u.s., there is a delicate balancing act between liberty and security. and it's still a work in progress. bret? >> bret: steve centanni live here in d.c. steve, thank you. some of the most compelling accounts to come out of boston are from the eyewitnesses. and the people who tried to help. correspondent douglas kennedy has that part of the story. [explosion] >> the bomb that where to through boilston street took with it lives and dreams. in fact, many people in boston and the nation. especially those who saw the mayhem firsthand. >> it went off, you know, my ears, you know, just from the compression of the explosive device hit us and shattered the window next to us. and, you know, and i looked back and i see a cloud of smoke. >> it took probably five or ten seconds to realize what had happened because it couldn't happen there. so, it was just too surreal. >> still personal tragedy quickly turned into communal hope as the city almost instantly came togethe
. the whole idea of the urban environment derailed, but the plans put forward for the park and for the national park. the same state and federal officials of the philadelphians are dealing with for the u.n. proposal were the ones who also were going to sign off on the part. this interesting connections there certainly. >> charlene, just being aware of time is here, but to continue the dialogue. i'd like to thank her again for her presentation. [applause] >> where the conservative book local action conference in washington d.c. with author paul kengor of "the communist." who was frank marshall davis? >> frank marshall davis was born in kansas 1905, died and made you and 87. ended up in chicago and ultimately honolulu and that's where he would meet a young man named barack obama in the 70s. he was introduced by obama's grandfather, stanley dunham. i should back up a little bit. he was african-american. he was a republican from the time of lincoln to fdr. remarkably what so far to the left that during world war ii he joined the communist party. he joined communist party u.s.a.
. there are actors within that environment. for them, had this been directly tied to have these two individuals been directly tied to those groups, i would be surprised if they didn't want to claim it. there are anti-american sentiments. host: what surprised you the most as you go through this data? guest: one of the positive surprises was the willingness the american people and working with law enforcement and department of homeland security in a way similar to the administration strategy for preventing violent extremism. a community-oriented approach that will increase communication between the community and government, and prevent radicalization from happening in the first place, and if it does occur, allowing the government and community to deal with it in a positive way before a terrorist plot is hatched. 57% of respondents indicated a willingness to work with law enforcement and dhs to establish those relationships ahead of time. it is a positive story. i see a lot of value in a community-oriented approach towards these counter radicalization. host: national consortium for the study of terrori
for our country, this attack. whether or not we are living in an environment that looks more like israel and great britain under the ira where these sort of things happen and we become used to them. that is not a reality that any of us want to accept in this country. i wonder if the administration -- which side of this they will fall on. i think we will see from eric holder what their take is really on this when it comes down to the way it's prosecuted. any guthrie action to whether or not this -- gut reaction to whether or not this signals a change. >> reporter: i think they will say to try this american citizen through the normal civil courts, civilian criminal courts, and that may have a harder sell. i'm not saying that is not what is going to happen, i'm not saying that is not what the administration can do, but i think they need to make the case. remember at the height, martha, of the problems that the british had with terror attacks from the ira, they created a special set of courts named for a fabled british judge named lord diplock. they didn't use the formal process for certain
up. ,,,, i live for this. but then my hearing problem started. in noisy environments, the voices were blurry, and i started missing things. it's like i was fading into the background. at connect hearing, we know how important hearing is to making the connections that are important to you. if you're having trouble hearing, call now to make an appointment with a local connect hearing professional. call to schedule a free hearing consultation, and learn how today's technology can help you. save hundreds with special offers available for a limited time. right now, get a $500 gift card good towards the purchase of any premium hearing aids when you make an appointment at your local connect hearing clinic. i'm glad i didn't give up. the hearing professionals at connect hearing gave me back my sundays. >>> we have some breaking news to tell you about right now. we're going to go live to captain jeff long in sky eye chopper 13. what's going on, jeff? >> well, denise. this is in the windsor hills area of west baltimore. the entire road here. this is clifton avenue, shut down with crime scene ta
, right? the world trade center attacks. this area knows this environment, this modern terrorist really well.l. what is -- modern terrorism ter really well. what is going on in the markets transcend what's is going on globally for a couple of reasons. we've had this unprecedentedcede move to the outside. uncharted territory for the major averages. that has to cool off, right. china growth slowing and gold rocketing so much so soon for so long that things are starting to taper off a little bit. b that's what we saw yesterdayrday before the bombings which did intensify the fear out there. >> lauren thanks as always. see you tomorrow.tomo >> all right.>> a >> thank you very much. a powerful earthquake has hit h iran today. wisdom martin is back with more on the top stories makingng headlines this morning. good morning, wisdom.dom. >> good morning, tony. this say really bad situation. officials in iran say the number of dead could run into the hundreds. the earthquake struck near iran's border with pakistan andd so far at least 40 people aree dead. the 7.8 quake is the strongesttr to hit th
slices so everybody can eat. you need to get more pizza. in order to do that you need an environment good for business. and i think they have all lost sight of that. it's not about taxes, redistribution. >> are you looking for a quick fix? >> there's no quick fix to this. there's a very difficult fix to this and things if both sides will have to do that are uncomfortable in the short run. lying about it isn't going to make it better. by saying social security, medicare, medicaid aren't in trouble, is not going to make it better. >> working so well. >> despicable. >> bob, thank you for coming in today. >> thank you. >> j.j., rick, see you soon. thank you. >> always a pleasure. >> our guest host will be with us the rest of the show. >> very excited this morning. >> tell us what you really think. coming up, more on goldman sack's earnings report. beating the streets expectations by 40%. up next, reaction from financial sector analysts. the one and only dick bove. ♪ ♪ the new blackberry z10 with time shift and blackberry balance. built to keep you moving. see it in action at blackberry.co
chemicals that poison our water... and harm wildlife. and millions... are polluting our environment. [ sniffing ] [ seagulls squawking ] >> following the latest with the bay bridge and those bolts that were found to be defective. jackie sissel is discovering more about these boats and their history. >> there are new reports out this morning indicating caltrans actually ordered some tests as early as 2008 on those boatsbulletolts. 96 of these bolts were put into the bay bridge. as they were being tightened, 33 of them actually it failed, cracked. the report today they say as early as 2008 there were questions about the integrity of these bowls and the manufacturer who actually made the bolts. that was the icing co. and ohio. caltrans ashley ordered additional tests on the bolts. they wanted to make sure that they were structurally it fine. for whatever reason, those tests were not done. one-third of the 96 bullets ultimately failed. why did tests were not done is obviously part of the investigation. how're they going to fix this? last week there was a press conference addressing this
whether these were small bits of metal placed there intentionally or part of the environment. >> reporter: shrapnel is just one of the clues investigators will be looking at. >> there are fragments everywhere, there are fragments everywhere, there are fragments within the victims. fragments in the sidewalk. what they're going to be able to do is probably reconstruct the timer device, what was used, they're going to look at the components of the bomb, able to tell them is this just somebody that put this together over the internet or is this a bomb maker? >> reporter: hundreds of state and federal investigators have descended on boston to try to find out who could have built the bombs and set them off. >> there are federal, state and local law enforcement all on scene and coordinating very close ly. the fbi has taken charge of the investigation. >> reporter: this type of attack has long been law enforcement's worst fear, a soft target where suspects can easily blend in and inflict mass casualties. the boston marathon is a heavily policed event. more than 500 national guard troops were on s
may also be a constraining factor. living in a bad home environment can be a big distraction. budget cuts is probably the worst problem of all. >> scheduled cuts that would take place unless congress acts would mean 8.2% cuts. >> cut. >> yes, cut. and these aren't just dollar signs in percent. they are children's futures. >> programs are designed to pick up the slack for kids whose needs aren't being met. all of those programs are designed to deliver needs of children not being met by the larger system. to cut seven point eight percent would have an incredible impact on students across america. >> before we fix the educational system, we need to find out what meets [indiscernible] >> we do have room for improvement. one of the areas that we are weak in is allowing students the opportunity to be creative in their learning and for us to decided relevance for students. with the advent of technologies, students don't teachers foreed information. they can go to the internet and get answers. but what they do need teachers for his what information is relevant? what information is accurate?
to this environment. >> clayton: would you need to show that the suspect was abouting on behalf of foreign power or in capacity as a military combatant to try him in a military trial? >> that is correct or treat him, put him in military system. we have don't have all the facts but the arguement is this. his older brother was inducted in al-qaeda affiliateddentity while he was being trained in russia. he came back and inducted his own brother. not all the facts on the table but what is troubling to me and senator whose statement you read is the administration is utterly uninterested in exploring this. they want the option off the table. instead of waiting for days or a couple of weeks until all the facts are in. i will be the first one to say if the facts don't support the classification as enemy combatant we should not do that, but we should not rush the process to give benefit of treating it as enemy combatant. >> clayton: what stood out to me the president's comments we're safe. we got him there. seemed to be a sense of wait a second, do we know all of the details yet? do we know the connectio
something? >> well, again, in that environment, you can wear a hat, a hood, sunglasses. but this person is likely one minded. they wanted to get in, plant the devices and be gone. even though they may be trying to duck and hide from cameras that are on the wall, there will be cameras in banks, convenience stores and thousands of people with iphones and a devices taking pictures. that's why law enforcement is at airports, bus terminals, train stations, asking people if you have pictures, especially taken directly before the explosion. share those with law enforcement. the bomber's picture is there. we just have to pick it out among the thousands of pictures that exist. >> all right. thank you for your time. still ahead, another live report from boston on the ground where the investigation stands right now. plus, we have new video coming in of the bombing of the point of view of a runner. we'll show you that video. er ] s joe woods' first day of work. and his new boss told him two things -- cook what you love, and save your money. joe doesn't know it yet, but he'll work his way up from bu
to bring a little kin to the environment. here's some of what you said. r.d. copeland tweeted us, i build raw bale and ear plasr homes. can you explain what that means? >> he's got two brothers. >> i was thinking the same thing. >> we applaud him for what he's doing. >> i bet it smells goodtoo. >> another one. lindsay says her forite way to save the planet,sing cloth apers an wipes. >> i heard about that when i had my daughter. >> and then what happened? >> i think i tried it for, like, two days. >> you have to watch them. i thought the smell, and the sink is full of you know what. >> why do you hate the environment? >> willie! >> giada knows being green is a ar round deal. she's been working with ks in an elementary school in l.a. to plant a gardennd grow their own food. >> that's terrific. >> how did this come about? >> what i did in partnership with my agency is that we adopted the school i compton, californ. it's foster elementa, and there's a lot of actual kids who are foster kids in the school. what i really wanted to do tru was just allow them to have a pleasant, fun, educational e
... and harm wildlife. and millions... are polluting our environment. [ sniffing ] [ seagulls squawking ] for us today. and we're going to leave you remembering the victims of the boston ma thon bombings. captioning sponsored by cbs captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org ,,,,,,,,,,
a weaker or softish commodity environment will drive that even further and higher. >> when i see you, the one commodity which is oil, give me your take here and correct me if i'm wrong, but you've always been a big bull. >> yeah. reality is oil. we just don't have a lot of new sources for it and you really have to take the world and slam it to almost zero growth before that would really undermine the supply/demand picture for oil. oil production grows about a million, a million and a half barrels a year and demand grows about that amount and the cost structure to bring that on is now $80 to $90 a barrel and i can't say this doomsday scenario that people say the oil markets will be prone to, and if it fits in the broader picture that the global economy is doing fine, you will see oil bottoming here in the next $5, $6 a barrel and probably making close to a new high by the end of the year. so everybody understands why that's a positive, but there are some who want to read both the decline in crude and gold as, all right, we're not going to have inflation and we're also not going to hav
words of calm. a day later, how is this sinking in? >> well, i think obviously the city, the environment around the city is still in a state of shock. the city will not be business as usual today. many of the streets around us you can see have been closed off, back bay, the entire area of the finish line is closed off and shut down. but like any city like new york, after september 11th, like any city in this country, people are resilient, we'll go on. >> yesterday was a special day for people outside of boston, can you explain? >> oh, joe. >> you know, the sox play, it's a holiday in boston, actually. >> it's a holiday. >> the sox play in the afternoon. you were there with your son. >> it's a traditional holiday. it's perhaps the greatest day for the city during the course of the year. it's a day when the entire city wears a smile. it's a day when hundreds of thousands of people arrive here from literally around the globe and certainly around the nation to run, first, in the boston marathon, 26 miles in massachusetts, to the boylston finish line. the game concludes just as the middle of
. this is a report from environment energy news -- talk about the push back. guest: it is interesting that comes from this group. we were talking earlier about the impact -- host: between the majors and the independents? guest: exactly at would be the smaller companies that would feel the brunt of this if the tax code was adjusted. they put all drill that maxwell and there is fewer dollars, there will be less wells that were drilled. another argument they bring up -- we have discussed two tax preferences so far which are intangible drilling costs and percentage to live -- depletion and these are industries specific. they are only available to the oil and gas industry. the argument being made here is that they are similar to other tax preferences that exist in the tax code. that our = availabl to other industries outside of oil and gas. host: are the proposals on capitol hill to just target the major industries as opposed to these independent producers? guest: the president is targeting of the entire industry. certain pieces of legislation, notably from senator robert menendez from new jersey introduc
easy. it is challenging in this fiscal environment. administrations 39 budget -- $39 million budget request. consistent with what congress appropriated in 2013 for the department before sequestration cuts were applied. the level of funding in this budget is lower than what congress appropriated in 2009. stepping back and thinking of the challenges that our country and this department has faced since 2009, times square bombing, hurricane sandy, the ever-changing and growing cyber threat, and of the boston attack, it is easy to become concerned with this budget request. we are facing extremely difficult budgetary times. sacrifices must be made. they may not receive all of the funding. and agencies in government must share in the sacrifice to some extent required during this deficit. our secretary seems to have taken this message to heart. he is identified $1.3 billion in savings this year and more than $4 billion since 2009. he continues to move from a risk-based approach and it effort to save more money. i'm happy to see this budget proposes a much-needed increase for cybersecurity,
you can't change and your environment. you can thing about brain diseases as really a disorder of a lifetime. there are things we can do. we can stamen tally active physically fit, socially engaged, eat a heart-healthy diet. >> we do all those things. what else? >> we can avoid head injuries, we can protect ourselves, have good positive lifestyles, no smokes, drinking drug use. i think more importantly is when we find we have a problem go to medical attention really early because one of the biggest risk factors is diabetes and things. >> physiologically was there something? you said less atrophy. what about size? >> the size for 280-year-old looks like the 50-year-old brains and the pew people who had died they study under autopsy, they seemed to have more neurons, more brain cells in certain regions of the brain that are responsible for the higher order of processing. >> in the future do, you think there will be something you can do that will change things? is there a miracle drug? >> if we know why they're staying so robust in theory you can find somet
't create a fail safe environment. >> reporter: investigators have swept up a large amount of potential evidence including small bomb fragments and surveillance pictures and tape but we have to say it's too early to know if this attack was a work of a terror group, domestic or foreign, or the act of a lone wolf who was inspired to act out. charlie? >> bob orr, thanks. cities around the country increased security. with us now is rudy giuliani mayor of new york city during the 9/11 attacks who consults with other cities on handling terror attacks and also john miller, nypd commissioner during mr. giuliani's tenure. a this turns the clock back to 2001. whatever the thinking was on september 12th is now the thinking today. >> it really reminds us right, of what we knew on september 11th and september 12th that the big news here is this is a horrible attack terrible attack, my heart goes out to the people that were hurt but surprising there haven't been more of these since september 11th. we expected many attacks like this. the raleally remarkable story is so many ha
ripe environment, target rich environment. it's just tragic to go from this horrific scene, i think everybody was just shocked, but i'll tell you what, i'm angry. i know a lot of other people are angry. i got a text, a long text from doug flutie, former quarterback, as you know, boston college fame, saying where do i sign up? who do we go and get? you see joann drowsy helping out a -- andruzi helping out. we're going to do a top to bottom review of what went right and wrong and make sure it doesn't happen again. >> steve: i understand the anger. but you look at all the first responders, all the police officers, all the national guardsmen who were there yesterday. the city was vigilant. yet it just takes one. >> listen, it does take one. certainly because it is the marathon, it is the showcase, really of the city and the state, you have all those people there anyway. thank goodness they were actually there because the first responders, the medical personnel, the tents are right there. they're able to adjust from high duration to almost like a war type of reaction, type of force to pr
committee that it is an rook anymore-rich environment and mr. speaker, i'm an acronym challenged individual, so i'll be talking about the network and information technology research and development program. in the future i'll call it the program. it's the federal government's main research and development effort in unclassified networking, computing, software cybersecurity, and related information technology. research conducted under this program has led to scientific growth and innovation in several areas, including technologies in science, engineering, and medicine, computer-based education and training, and near real time weather forecasts which is really important in my state of wyoming. currently 15 federal agencies are contributing members to the program and even more participate. so h.r. 967, the bill in front of us, does two things. it updates the high performance computing act of 1991, and it re-authorizes the program to advance our nation's networking and information technology research and development. it's the digital age, mr. speaker. advances in networking and information tech
work environment, that their paychecks will arrive on time and the benefits they earn are the ones they receive. under president clinton, john served as deputy assistant secretary and acting assistant secretary for law enforcement at the treasury department. overseeing the united states secret service and the bureau of alcohol, tobacco and firearms. and he later moved to the interior department where he was assistant secretary for policy, management and budget, essentially the manager of the department of interior. before coming to the office of personnel management, john spent nearly a decade working on conservation as director of the fish and wildlife foundation, and then arguably the job he perhaps has enjoyed most, he became director of the national zoo. at the national zoo, he was so successful turning around a faltering institution that after he left they named a lion in his honor. john indeed was a lion, a lion on behalf of the federal employees, a lion on behalf of good government, a lion on behalf of integrity. john know he is a true leader and manager and an incredibly wa
the situation. the safety of everyone that ntue to dovethgo wils always ensure a safe environment for our fans." this notion ofpoing events, like the boston marathon, which hasad us loong at other viously, we have tonn marathon on sunday, officials there is a that they are paying close attention to their security preparations, we have also got some other races, i chke john. n ancisco marathon in ju, billy broadtreet run in may, indiana 500 festiva in may. lansing, michigan, in april, and raon inapl.cnt music obvisl ainwee talking about no credie threats, but officials in boston said no credible threats before tha o either, john. >>recautions are necesry important, and detandable the celticsamn boston, canceled. doesn't really matter. the playoffs just around the corner. that game will not be made up. shannon travis, our thanks to you. one other story about a sporting event which reallyauty attention overnight. fans of the oakland a's in oakland, tryg to rally fans to start instead of let's go a's chant, a let's go bostonchant. that just shows you how fans and right now.he city country are repu
, constructing support mounts for objects, doing additional cleaning in a dry, stable environment. b. altman goal is to put these into the gallery and be able to share as much of the story of how these pumps operated, how they were made, what you're used for, their historical accounts from the sinking. we know that up to last when water put out the oilers, the pumps stopped moving. those are the things to consider is when dupont got here, the valve was still in position at its last moment. the think of the crew of monitor and the things they experienced and the struggles that they undertook to preserve c it ison and how ironi that today 100 petite years later they are still serving the nation in ways they could never have imagined, helping us understand marine conservation, understanding our past, and helping us look forward and learned from the lessons of the past. >> this weekend, looking at the history and literary lights for virginia beach, virginia, including more from the mariners' museum, saturday and noon eastern on c-span2. and sunday at 5:00 on american on c-span3. >> washington journal
whether this came from the environment, right? but it is not. >> i can tell you, as a person who has done trauma surgery, it can be difficult to tell sometimes when you're actually taking some of the shrapnel, wear exactly did it come from. but now they're saying without a doubt, we asked a few times, that there were nails, carpenter nails specifically and, quote, bb-like metal within some of these patients. and so they -- they know for sure it came from the explosive device. this is a doctor saying that based on their medical examination. this wasn't just debris that was lying around. >> what about also quickly in terms of the amputations, i was hearing one of the doctors saying last night, some of the patients were coming to them very injured, bleeding and saying, take whatever you need, i want to be alive. that has to be tough for a doctor, though. >> these are i think heart breaking decisions. it is a -- you can make the decision fairly quickly if that's going to be the best course of action. >> life or death. >> if you don't do the amputation, sometimes it can mean infection, that ca
. not clear if they're from the bomb itself or from -- from the environment around the bomb. the operations that we have performed are identical to the kind of work we would do in the army at a surgical team or combat support hospital. >> dr. king performed more than five surgeries on victims yesterday alone. >>> the thousands of runners still on the boston marathon's course when the bombs went off crossed something of a finish line yesterday in downtown boston. they were able to reclaim their belongings from marathon volunteers and given a medal for participating in the race. everyone had them. it had a unique story about this experience. >> of course, at first shock. you know not that i didn't believe my sister. nobody around me really seemed to know anything. nothing was out of the usual. runners kept going. but i decided to leave the route. and even running through the streets. >> her sister was across the street from where the bombs went off. she said the second blast rattled her teeth. she was hit by small pieces of shrapnel but unhurt. >> going back to those medals, really, that's wh
and my being chair of the democratic party and protection of the environment, civil rights women's rights, gay rights economic justice, social justice, central america, anti-quandra, you name it. casey kason was there. i marched alongside of him in so many rallies, i can't tell you. he was a wonderful, wonderful guy. he is best known for top 40. once in a while, he moot lose his temper as he did when he was once asked to give a dedication to a little boy who lost -- whose dog had died and then he had to suddenly go from that into some up-beat song, and casey wasn't happy with what his producers had done to him. here he is. >> dear casey, this may seem to be a strange dedication request, but i am quite sincere, and it will mean a lot if you play it. recently, there was a death in our family. he was a little dog named snuggles but he was most certainly -- going to start again. i am coming out of the record. play the record please. >> not happy when you come out of those up-tempo numbers, it's impossible to make those transactions and go into somebody
harsh, but is there a sense you put yourself in that environment enough that you are on borrowed time. the odds are such that you get hit anywhere, at any time. >> yeah. there vicious people and you care deeply about the world and they put their lives at risk. i got out. within the hour, i decided i had too many close calls. >> quickly. >> within an hour. you have to leave before you lose all your money. >> sebastian, which way is the frontline from here on hbo tomorrow at 8:00. thank you. we are going to make a move to breaking news on the boston medical center. dr. peter burke is talking to the press about the condition of the victims that are being treated there. . >> their lungs are not working and heart is not working and depending on what you bring to the table, that can be different. >> [inaudible]. >> not that i'm aware of. i'm sure it's available. the general process when you remove things from people we send them to the pathologist. that's the process. they will be available, i assume. we are talking about fragments taken out of the victims in this case. >> [inaudible]. . >>
environment. the ultimate goal is to put these into the gallery and be able to share is much of the operatedhow the pumps and how they were made. we know that the one in front of us up until almost the last moment was working hard to try to keep the ship from sinking. unfortunately, when the water pushes out the oilers -- ump stoppede p moving. >> i think of the crew of the monitor and the things they experienced and the struggles that they undertook to preserve the union and how ironic is that today, 151 years later, they are still serving the nation but in a very different way and in ways they could never imagine, for helping us understand marine conservation and about our past and helping us move forward and learn from the lessons of the past. to, looking at the history and literary life of virginia beach, virginia, including more from the mariners' museum, saturday and noon eastern on c-span2. and sunday at 5:00 on c-span3. >> "washington journal" continues. texaswe're back with republican louie gohmert, a member of the judiciary committee. thanks for being here. guest: n
create if they're released into the environment where they don't have any natural enemies. in seven weeks each female can produce 1200 eggs a year. yikes. will emerge from the ground after florida's rainy season ends. [ screaming ] >> import a bunch of frenchmen. >> stephanie: buy more butter. don't be left unprepared. >> they have python problem in florida and now they have sinkholes and now -- snails the size of buicks. >> stephanie: that sounds awful. >> and your hair would frizz. >> stephanie: not since that appearance for a miami station in august. my '80s hair again. [ explosion ] pay for a blowout straightening and i ironed it. like a minute and a half and. [ explosion ] i'm linked to mob squad again. >> no beauty or vanity in florida in august. >> stephanie: sweating! oh god. i would dry myself with a giant snail. sweating, that's all it is. all right. we were talking about -- oh, we still haven't gotten over the right wing caller even yesterday oh how come you aren't blaming obama? everyone blamed bush the same day 9-11 happened. [ buzzer ] which is complete crap. really bad anal
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